Experiment explains how tiger stripes are formed

Suit on objectionable content motivated: Yahoo IndiaValidating a theory famous code-breaker and mathematician Alan Turing put forth in 1950s, researchers at King’s College london have provided the first experimental evidence to show how tiger stripes o…

Suit on objectionable content motivated: Yahoo IndiaValidating a theory famous code-breaker and mathematician Alan Turing put forth in 1950s, researchers at King’s College london have provided the first experimental evidence to show how tiger stripes or leopard spots are formed.
 Turing had proposed that regular repeating patterns in biological systems are generated by a pair of morphogens that work together as an ‘activator’ and ‘inhibitor,’ the journal ‘Nature Genetics’ reports.
To test the theory, researchers studied the development of the regularly-spaced ridges found in the roof of the mouth in mice, according to a King’s College statement.
Experimentation with mouse embryos helped the team identify the pair of specific morphogens working together to influence where each ridge will be formed.
They showed that the increasing or decreasing activity of morphogens affects the pattern of the ridges in the mouth palate, in ways predicted by Turing’s equations.
Jeremy Green, craniofacial surgeon from King’s Dental Institute said: “Regularly spaced structures, from vertebrae and hair follicles to the stripes on a tiger or zebrafish, are a fundamental motif in biology. Our study provides the first experimental identification of an activator-inhibitor system at work in the generation of stripes – in this case, in the ridges of the mouth palate.”
“As this year marks Turing’s centenary, it is a fitting tribute to this great mathematician and computer scientist that we should now be able to prove that his theory was right all along!” concluded Green.

Experiment explains how tiger stripes are formed

Suit on objectionable content motivated: Yahoo IndiaValidating a theory famous code-breaker and mathematician Alan Turing put forth in 1950s, researchers at King’s College london have provided the first experimental evidence to show how tiger stripes o…

Suit on objectionable content motivated: Yahoo IndiaValidating a theory famous code-breaker and mathematician Alan Turing put forth in 1950s, researchers at King’s College london have provided the first experimental evidence to show how tiger stripes or leopard spots are formed.
 Turing had proposed that regular repeating patterns in biological systems are generated by a pair of morphogens that work together as an ‘activator’ and ‘inhibitor,’ the journal ‘Nature Genetics’ reports.
To test the theory, researchers studied the development of the regularly-spaced ridges found in the roof of the mouth in mice, according to a King’s College statement.
Experimentation with mouse embryos helped the team identify the pair of specific morphogens working together to influence where each ridge will be formed.
They showed that the increasing or decreasing activity of morphogens affects the pattern of the ridges in the mouth palate, in ways predicted by Turing’s equations.
Jeremy Green, craniofacial surgeon from King’s Dental Institute said: “Regularly spaced structures, from vertebrae and hair follicles to the stripes on a tiger or zebrafish, are a fundamental motif in biology. Our study provides the first experimental identification of an activator-inhibitor system at work in the generation of stripes – in this case, in the ridges of the mouth palate.”
“As this year marks Turing’s centenary, it is a fitting tribute to this great mathematician and computer scientist that we should now be able to prove that his theory was right all along!” concluded Green.

Suit on objectionable content motivated: Yahoo India

Yahoo India, facing trial for hosting objectionable material on its website, has told a Delhi court that the suit against it was “motivated” and should be dismissed.”The suit is a complete abuse of the process of law,” Yahoo India said in its reply to …

Yahoo India, facing trial for hosting objectionable material on its website, has told a Delhi court that the suit against it was “motivated” and should be dismissed.“The suit is a complete abuse of the process of law,” Yahoo India said in its reply to the court’s direction to 21 social networking and other sites to remove objectionable content from their web pages.
The suit should be dismissed, Yahoo India urged the court.
Administrative Civil Judge Praveen Singh, at the last hearing Feb 6, had directed the websites to file a written statement within 15 days and had warned them against displaying objectionable content on their sites.
Tuesday was the deadline for filing the statements. Yahoo India filed its statement Feb 17.

Suit on objectionable content motivated: Yahoo India

Yahoo India, facing trial for hosting objectionable material on its website, has told a Delhi court that the suit against it was “motivated” and should be dismissed.”The suit is a complete abuse of the process of law,” Yahoo India said in its reply to …

Yahoo India, facing trial for hosting objectionable material on its website, has told a Delhi court that the suit against it was “motivated” and should be dismissed.“The suit is a complete abuse of the process of law,” Yahoo India said in its reply to the court’s direction to 21 social networking and other sites to remove objectionable content from their web pages.
The suit should be dismissed, Yahoo India urged the court.
Administrative Civil Judge Praveen Singh, at the last hearing Feb 6, had directed the websites to file a written statement within 15 days and had warned them against displaying objectionable content on their sites.
Tuesday was the deadline for filing the statements. Yahoo India filed its statement Feb 17.

IAEA team completes inspection of Kudankulam plant

A two-member International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team completed the annual inspection of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KNPP) Tuesday, said a senior official of the Nuclear Power Corp of India Ltd (NPCIL).”The IAEA team went in around 8.30…

A two-member International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team completed the annual inspection of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KNPP) Tuesday, said a senior official of the Nuclear Power Corp of India Ltd (NPCIL).“The IAEA team went in around 8.30 a.m. Monday and completed the job around 1 a.m. Tuesday. Normally, it takes around two days for the inspection. But as the situation is abnormal at Kudankulam, the IAEA decided to complete the job despite working very late hours,” the official told IANS over phone on the condition of anonymity.
Meanwhile, the People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy (PMANE) began its 72-hour fast starting midnight Monday demanding the closure of the KNPP.
According to NPCIL officials, the IAEA inspection is a routine annual affair. In February last year too the team had carried out an inspection.
The KNPP is under safeguard as per the agreement between the Indian government and the IAEA. So the latter has the power to inspect the power station.
“The locals have been treating us badly and foul-mouthing us. We did not want any such incident to happen to the IAEA team,” the official said.
According to him, the IAEA officials inspected the reactor building and fuel storage facilities. They also checked the inventory nuclear materials.
“The IAEA inspectors also checked the memory cards of the surveillance cameras to check out whether there were any blackouts,” he added.
India’s nuclear power plant operator, NPCIL, is building two 1,000 MW atomic power reactors with Russian collaboration at Kudankulam in Tirunelveli district, around 650 km from Chennai.
However villagers in Kudankulam, Idinthakarai and nearby areas, fearing their safety in case of any accident, are dead set against the project.
Their agitation, led by PMANE, has put a stop to the project work, delaying the commissioning of the first unit was slated for December 2011.
As the Tamil Nadu government urged the central government to halt work at the power plant and allay fears of the people, the central and state governments set up two panels.
After meeting thrice last year, the final meeting between the two panels slated for Jan 31 did not take place. The central panel submitted its report, declaring that its job is over.
Subsequently the Tamil Nadu government set up a four-member expert committee to look into the project’s safety aspects and the fears of the local people.
The panel, including Atomic Energy Commission’s former chairman M.R. Srinivasan, visited KNPP and met PMANE representatives.
Their clean chit to the plant upset the PMANE.
“The panel seems to be biased. If they want to say the Kudankulam project is safe, then they should have said that in their report to the state government. They should not have certified about the plant at the press meet,” M. Pushparayan, convener of Coastal People’s Federation and a leader of PMANE, told IANS.
He said the state panel did not meet the villagers or members of PMANE’s expert panel.

IAEA team completes inspection of Kudankulam plant

A two-member International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team completed the annual inspection of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KNPP) Tuesday, said a senior official of the Nuclear Power Corp of India Ltd (NPCIL).”The IAEA team went in around 8.30…

A two-member International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team completed the annual inspection of the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KNPP) Tuesday, said a senior official of the Nuclear Power Corp of India Ltd (NPCIL).“The IAEA team went in around 8.30 a.m. Monday and completed the job around 1 a.m. Tuesday. Normally, it takes around two days for the inspection. But as the situation is abnormal at Kudankulam, the IAEA decided to complete the job despite working very late hours,” the official told IANS over phone on the condition of anonymity.
Meanwhile, the People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy (PMANE) began its 72-hour fast starting midnight Monday demanding the closure of the KNPP.
According to NPCIL officials, the IAEA inspection is a routine annual affair. In February last year too the team had carried out an inspection.
The KNPP is under safeguard as per the agreement between the Indian government and the IAEA. So the latter has the power to inspect the power station.
“The locals have been treating us badly and foul-mouthing us. We did not want any such incident to happen to the IAEA team,” the official said.
According to him, the IAEA officials inspected the reactor building and fuel storage facilities. They also checked the inventory nuclear materials.
“The IAEA inspectors also checked the memory cards of the surveillance cameras to check out whether there were any blackouts,” he added.
India’s nuclear power plant operator, NPCIL, is building two 1,000 MW atomic power reactors with Russian collaboration at Kudankulam in Tirunelveli district, around 650 km from Chennai.
However villagers in Kudankulam, Idinthakarai and nearby areas, fearing their safety in case of any accident, are dead set against the project.
Their agitation, led by PMANE, has put a stop to the project work, delaying the commissioning of the first unit was slated for December 2011.
As the Tamil Nadu government urged the central government to halt work at the power plant and allay fears of the people, the central and state governments set up two panels.
After meeting thrice last year, the final meeting between the two panels slated for Jan 31 did not take place. The central panel submitted its report, declaring that its job is over.
Subsequently the Tamil Nadu government set up a four-member expert committee to look into the project’s safety aspects and the fears of the local people.
The panel, including Atomic Energy Commission’s former chairman M.R. Srinivasan, visited KNPP and met PMANE representatives.
Their clean chit to the plant upset the PMANE.
“The panel seems to be biased. If they want to say the Kudankulam project is safe, then they should have said that in their report to the state government. They should not have certified about the plant at the press meet,” M. Pushparayan, convener of Coastal People’s Federation and a leader of PMANE, told IANS.
He said the state panel did not meet the villagers or members of PMANE’s expert panel.

US marks 50 years since putting first American in orbit

Russian scientists revive plants frozen for 30,000 yearsFifty years ago, Marine Corps officer John Glenn, wearing a flight suit and helmet similar to those he had worn as a fighter pilot, climbed inside a small capsule and went on to become the first A…

Russian scientists revive plants frozen for 30,000 yearsFifty years ago, Marine Corps officer John Glenn, wearing a flight suit and helmet similar to those he had worn as a fighter pilot, climbed inside a small capsule and went on to become the first American to orbit the Earth.
The US is commemorating Glenn’s exploit with a series of tributes, and Monday night he will attend a dinner in his honour at Ohio State University, where he will take part in a chat with the crew of the International Space Station.
The space pioneer, now 90 years old, said recently that he is surprised that people still take such an interest in those first space flights.
The reason undoubtedly lies in the patriotic significance of his own voyage. Glenn, a veteran of World War II and the Korean War, in just a few hours restored American pride, damaged when the Soviet Union took the lead in the early days of the space race.
The Friendship 7 spacecraft, the size of a Volkswagen Beetle, blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, carried into space by a Mercury-Atlas rocket, and completed three orbits in four hours, 55 minutes and 20 seconds.
After re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere, the spacecraft fell into the Atlantic Ocean where it was picked up by a navy ship.
When the hatch opened and the courageous Glenn appeared smiling broadly, he had won one of the most important battles of the Cold War: the image battle.
In the space race, the Soviet Union had seized the advantage when Oct 4, 1957 its 86-kg artificial satellite Sputnik began the first of some 1,440 orbits of the Earth. For three months the satellite continued sending its “bip bip” signal from outer space, a humiliating experience for the US.
Soviets and Americans competed sending capsules into space, in many cases with animals that paid with their lives to satisfy human ambition.
These were followed by mankind’s true pioneers outside the Earth’s atmosphere.
On April 12, 1962, Soviet fighter pilot Yuri Gagarin, aboard the space capsule Vostok, completed an orbit of the Earth.
The US stepped up its space program and sent two of its men, Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom, on separate missions that did not go into orbit but rather consisted of up-and-down flights beyond the atmosphere that rapidly returned to Earth.
On Aug 6 the Soviets struck again: air force officer German Titov in the Vostok spacecraft orbited the Earth 17 times and was the first human to show that a person can remain more than a single day in space.
Titov, then 26 and still the youngest human ever to travel into outer space, was the first astronaut to directly pilot a spacecraft and took the first photos from orbit.
That was the context in which Glenn became, in the words of novelist Tom Wolfe, “the last true national hero America has ever had”.
Glenn went from his career in the military and as an astronaut into politics, and for 25 years represented Ohio in the US Senate.
In October 1998, Glenn became a pioneer once more – at 77 he was the oldest human ever to travel in space, during a mission aboard the space shuttle Discovery.

US marks 50 years since putting first American in orbit

Russian scientists revive plants frozen for 30,000 yearsFifty years ago, Marine Corps officer John Glenn, wearing a flight suit and helmet similar to those he had worn as a fighter pilot, climbed inside a small capsule and went on to become the first A…

Russian scientists revive plants frozen for 30,000 yearsFifty years ago, Marine Corps officer John Glenn, wearing a flight suit and helmet similar to those he had worn as a fighter pilot, climbed inside a small capsule and went on to become the first American to orbit the Earth.
The US is commemorating Glenn’s exploit with a series of tributes, and Monday night he will attend a dinner in his honour at Ohio State University, where he will take part in a chat with the crew of the International Space Station.
The space pioneer, now 90 years old, said recently that he is surprised that people still take such an interest in those first space flights.
The reason undoubtedly lies in the patriotic significance of his own voyage. Glenn, a veteran of World War II and the Korean War, in just a few hours restored American pride, damaged when the Soviet Union took the lead in the early days of the space race.
The Friendship 7 spacecraft, the size of a Volkswagen Beetle, blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, carried into space by a Mercury-Atlas rocket, and completed three orbits in four hours, 55 minutes and 20 seconds.
After re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere, the spacecraft fell into the Atlantic Ocean where it was picked up by a navy ship.
When the hatch opened and the courageous Glenn appeared smiling broadly, he had won one of the most important battles of the Cold War: the image battle.
In the space race, the Soviet Union had seized the advantage when Oct 4, 1957 its 86-kg artificial satellite Sputnik began the first of some 1,440 orbits of the Earth. For three months the satellite continued sending its “bip bip” signal from outer space, a humiliating experience for the US.
Soviets and Americans competed sending capsules into space, in many cases with animals that paid with their lives to satisfy human ambition.
These were followed by mankind’s true pioneers outside the Earth’s atmosphere.
On April 12, 1962, Soviet fighter pilot Yuri Gagarin, aboard the space capsule Vostok, completed an orbit of the Earth.
The US stepped up its space program and sent two of its men, Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom, on separate missions that did not go into orbit but rather consisted of up-and-down flights beyond the atmosphere that rapidly returned to Earth.
On Aug 6 the Soviets struck again: air force officer German Titov in the Vostok spacecraft orbited the Earth 17 times and was the first human to show that a person can remain more than a single day in space.
Titov, then 26 and still the youngest human ever to travel into outer space, was the first astronaut to directly pilot a spacecraft and took the first photos from orbit.
That was the context in which Glenn became, in the words of novelist Tom Wolfe, “the last true national hero America has ever had”.
Glenn went from his career in the military and as an astronaut into politics, and for 25 years represented Ohio in the US Senate.
In October 1998, Glenn became a pioneer once more – at 77 he was the oldest human ever to travel in space, during a mission aboard the space shuttle Discovery.

Russian scientists revive plants frozen for 30,000 years

A team of Russian biophysicists has successfully grown ancient plants from tissue material that stayed frozen in the Siberian region for about 30,000 years.This is the oldest plant material to have been brought to life so far.The team from the Institut…

A team of Russian biophysicists has successfully grown ancient plants from tissue material that stayed frozen in the Siberian region for about 30,000 years.This is the oldest plant material to have been brought to life so far.
The team from the Institute of Cell Biophysics, led by David Gilichinsky, studied squirrel hibernation burrows in the banks of the Kolyma river and found the remains of the Silene stenophylla family that remained almost intact over millennia.
According to a report published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists extracted the so-called “placental tissue” from immature seeds and put it in a special nutrient solution, which imitated a growing plant.
After a while, the tissue in petri dishes germinated into mature seeds, which have been planted in soil and grew into fully-blossoming plants.
The scientists found only subtle differences in the shape of petals and the sex of flowers between the “resurrected” plants and the modern-day Silene stenophylla, which still grows in the Siberian tundra.
The research team suggested that tissue cells were a perfect material for their experiments because they contain high amounts of sugar, which helped the plants to survive in a hibernated state for so long.
The success of the scientists may open a door to a whole new area of experiments in reviving extinct plants buried under layers of soil, especially in the Arctic zone, for thousands of years.

Russian scientists revive plants frozen for 30,000 years

A team of Russian biophysicists has successfully grown ancient plants from tissue material that stayed frozen in the Siberian region for about 30,000 years.This is the oldest plant material to have been brought to life so far.The team from the Institut…

A team of Russian biophysicists has successfully grown ancient plants from tissue material that stayed frozen in the Siberian region for about 30,000 years.This is the oldest plant material to have been brought to life so far.
The team from the Institute of Cell Biophysics, led by David Gilichinsky, studied squirrel hibernation burrows in the banks of the Kolyma river and found the remains of the Silene stenophylla family that remained almost intact over millennia.
According to a report published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists extracted the so-called “placental tissue” from immature seeds and put it in a special nutrient solution, which imitated a growing plant.
After a while, the tissue in petri dishes germinated into mature seeds, which have been planted in soil and grew into fully-blossoming plants.
The scientists found only subtle differences in the shape of petals and the sex of flowers between the “resurrected” plants and the modern-day Silene stenophylla, which still grows in the Siberian tundra.
The research team suggested that tissue cells were a perfect material for their experiments because they contain high amounts of sugar, which helped the plants to survive in a hibernated state for so long.
The success of the scientists may open a door to a whole new area of experiments in reviving extinct plants buried under layers of soil, especially in the Arctic zone, for thousands of years.